Firearms and History

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16 notes

the-blood-of-history:

The 1804–1813 Russo-Persian War, was one of the many wars between the Persian Empire and Imperial Russia, and began like many of their wars as a territorial dispute. The newly Persian king, Fath Ali Shah Qajar, wanted to consolidate the northernmost reaches of his Qajar dynasty comprising modern day Georgia and Dagestan, who got annexed by Tsar Paul several years after the signing of the Treaty of Georgievsk, the sack of Tblisi by the Qajars and the Russo-Persian War of 1796. Like his Persian counterpart, the Russian Tsar Alexander I was also new to the throne and equally determined to control the disputed territories. The war ended with the Treaty of Gulistan which ceded the vast majority of the previously disputed territories to Imperial Russia.

the-blood-of-history:

The 1804–1813 Russo-Persian War, was one of the many wars between the Persian Empire and Imperial Russia, and began like many of their wars as a territorial dispute. The newly Persian king, Fath Ali Shah Qajar, wanted to consolidate the northernmost reaches of his Qajar dynasty comprising modern day Georgia and Dagestan, who got annexed by Tsar Paul several years after the signing of the Treaty of Georgievsk, the sack of Tblisi by the Qajars and the Russo-Persian War of 1796. Like his Persian counterpart, the Russian Tsar Alexander I was also new to the throne and equally determined to control the disputed territories. The war ended with the Treaty of Gulistan which ceded the vast majority of the previously disputed territories to Imperial Russia.

(via king-in-prussia)

Filed under history

865 notes

art-of-swords:

Short Sword

  • Dated: circa 1530 — 1540
  • Culture: South German or Swiss
  • Medium: steel, leather
  • Measurements: overall length,78.6 cm; grup length, 8.2 cm; blade length, 65.3 cm, quillons width, 18.6 cm; weight, 1.5 kg

The form of the guards of this sword is typically South German of the second quarter of the 16th century, but the pommel is as distinctively Venetian while its blade bears the mark of Basle. It seems that such marks stamped upon blades do not refer to its place of origin of the blade, but of the hilt in which it is mounted. Therefore it seems to be reasonable to assume that this sword is, basically, Swiss, though it has the appearance of a hybrid.

A particularly fine sword with a similar guard is in Rome, in the Odescalchi Collection, Mu. no. 185. This is illustrated in Nolfo di Carpegna’s catalogue of its collection, and in Boccia and Coelho’s ‘Nemi Bianche Italiane’, no. 381. A sword with an almost identical pommel and similar guards was sold by the Galerie Helbing in Madrid in 1908, from which sale some of the Medieval swords in the Fitzwilliam Collection came.

The pommel has the form of a crown of three fleusons, the middle on a long truncated cone accommodating the top of the long, which is switched over without a button. The sword features a half-basket guard of four elements of flat triangular section. The knuckle-guard is turned over at the top, the loop-guard covering the back of the hand, springing from the top of the knuckle-guard and meeting the midpoint of a forward ring-guard. Between these two guards is an S-shaped counter-guard. 

The sword has a straight quillons of the same flat triangular section as the guards. The quillons widens toward the tips, which are cut off straight and finished with small spherical knobs. The back-guard is made of one bar, springing from the root of the outside quillon and joining the end of a single short outside branch.

The grip is of oval section, widening toward the pommel, covered in red-brown leather. The broad back-edged blade, with a shallow fuller just inside the back edge which ends in a short cusp at the point. The back is very slightly curved. The blade bears its stamped mark of the City of Basle.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Filed under swords art of swords

66 notes

thecivilwarparlor:

Reunion At The Crater
In a photograph of reconciliation taken in 1887, former Confederate general William Mahone, at bottom center with long white beard, stands amid ex-Union soldiers from the 57th Massachusetts Regiment on the site where the Battle of the Crater had taken place on July 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia. That day, a massive explosion set off by Union soldiers in a tunnel beneath Confederate lines created a giant bowl-like depression in the ground. The 57th was one of the first regiments to enter the Crater during the ensuing battle. The attacking Union soldiers were then trapped, leaving them easy targets for Confederate soldiers.
Mahone successfully led the Confederate counterattack, and in the process captured members of the 57th Regiment. Survivors of the regiment are shown here sporting badges on their lapels. Mahone’s actions at the Crater made him a hero of the Confederacy and he was promoted to the rank of major general within a matter of days. When this photograph was taken in 1887, some twenty-three years after the battle, Mahone was nearing the end of his distinguished post-war political career. The previous year Mahone had lost his seat in the United States Senate as a member of the short-lived Readjuster Party; in 1889 he ran for governor of Virginia under the banner of the Republican Party and was defeated.

Original Author: Unknown
Created: May 3, 1887
Medium: Photographic print
Virginia Historical Society

thecivilwarparlor:

Reunion At The Crater

In a photograph of reconciliation taken in 1887, former Confederate general William Mahone, at bottom center with long white beard, stands amid ex-Union soldiers from the 57th Massachusetts Regiment on the site where the Battle of the Crater had taken place on July 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia. That day, a massive explosion set off by Union soldiers in a tunnel beneath Confederate lines created a giant bowl-like depression in the ground. The 57th was one of the first regiments to enter the Crater during the ensuing battle. The attacking Union soldiers were then trapped, leaving them easy targets for Confederate soldiers.

Mahone successfully led the Confederate counterattack, and in the process captured members of the 57th Regiment. Survivors of the regiment are shown here sporting badges on their lapels. Mahone’s actions at the Crater made him a hero of the Confederacy and he was promoted to the rank of major general within a matter of days. When this photograph was taken in 1887, some twenty-three years after the battle, Mahone was nearing the end of his distinguished post-war political career. The previous year Mahone had lost his seat in the United States Senate as a member of the short-lived Readjuster Party; in 1889 he ran for governor of Virginia under the banner of the Republican Party and was defeated.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: May 3, 1887

Medium: Photographic print

Virginia Historical Society

Filed under history civil war